Fri. Apr 19th, 2024

Speaking at the DA’s provincial manifesto launch in Verulam on Saturday, Pappas said he would aim to create 300,000 “real” jobs in the province by investing in infrastructure to support key economic sectors.

His government would also encourage businesses to invest in the region by “radically” reducing the red tape and endless compliance that hinders growth.

In addition the DA planned to set up “one-stop-shops” to reduce the time and cost of starting a business, while also making provision for a work-seekers transport allowance.

“And when I talk about jobs, I am not talking about the ‘piece jobs’ that the ANC promises under the expanded public works programme,” Pappas said.

“Let me be clear: there is nothing wrong with those jobs. But they are not a permanent solution to poverty.

“When I talk about jobs, I am talking about real jobs, permanent jobs. Jobs that can be the launchpad for a career of meaningful work.”

The premier candidate said his government would establish partnerships with the private sector to strengthen crucial energy, transport, water and communication infrastructure.

“Wherever we go, we ask people about the biggest problems they face. And the answer is always the lack of jobs,” Pappas added.

“Because, without a job, a person cannot move forward with their life. Without a job a person loses their dignity. A job is the key that unlocks the door of opportunity.”

The candidate, who is currently mayor of the uMngeni municipality, acknowledged that electricity supply remained the biggest hurdle to economic growth.

He said the solution to the country’s electricity crisis must come from increased power generation outside of Eskom. To that end, Pappas pledged to build a diversified and competitive energy sector that includes independent power producers. The DA would also pay people cash for their surplus electricity, as is the case in the Western Cape.

Provincial police force desperately needed

Regarding crime, Pappas said he would fight for the creation of a provincial police service that was free of political interference.

“We need to do things differently if we are going to turn the tide on lawlessness and keep the people of this community – and every other community – safe from violent criminals.

“We need to stop relying on the national SAPS to keep us safe.

“Because a Police Minister in Pretoria cannot fight crime in Phoenix or Umlazi or Chatsworth or Imbali or Umhlanga or Verulam,” Pappas concluded.

By Joy

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